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School of Mass Communication

Undergraduate Bulletin
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Undergraduate & Graduate Dates to Remember*

Fall Term 2009

August 26-30 Wolfpack Welcome
August 31 Classes begin
September 4
Add deadline
October 30 Last day to withdraw & last day
to apply for graduation
December 11 Last day of classes
December 12-18 Final Exams

Spring Term 2010

January 8 New Student Orientation
January 11 Classes begin
January 15 Add deadline
March 12 Last day to withdraw & last day to apply for graduation
April 28 Last day of classes
April 30 - May 6 Final Exams
May 8 Commencement - all colleges

*College of Law dates on Law Bulletin

DIRECTOR: Sonya Duhé, Ph.D., Office: 332 Communications/Music Complex
PROFESSORS: Sonya Duhé, A. L. Lorenz, David M. Myers, Robert A. Thomas
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: S. L. Alexander, Leslie G. Parr, J. Cathy Rogers
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Valerie Andrews, Yolanda Cal, David Zemmels
VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Michael Perlstein
INSTRUCTORS: Cheryl Dejoie-Lacabe, Les J. East, Michael Giusti, Rachael Hatley, Lisa Martin, Liz B. Scott

WEB PAGE: css.loyno.edu/masscomm

MISSION

The School of Mass Communication educates students to have a critical understanding and comprehensive body of knowledge of the techniques, theories and social consequences of our complex national and global communications system. In our technologically intense fields in which method and form are major concerns, we educate students to become intellectual, artistic and ethical professional leaders in the rapidly changing information environment.

In the Jesuit tradition, we are committed to understanding and advancing social justice through service to our university, our communities and our disciplines. As scholars, staff, students, and alumni, we value the media as social instruments and are committed to the ethical integration and application of communication skills, knowledge and values in the interconnected and diverse world around us.

STRUCTURE OF THE SCHOOL

The School of Mass Communication offers four areas of study: advertising, journalism, public relations and media studies.

Each area has communication electives, a policy that reflects the convergence of media in our time. A journalism student might take courses in public relations or a public relations student might seek out a course in advertising to be better prepared for professional life.

All Mass Communication majors take a core of five communication courses: Introduction to Mass Communication, Communication Writing, Digital Communication, Mass Communication Theory and Research and Law of Mass Communication.

Also housed in the School of Mass Communication are the Center for Environmental Communication, the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications and the Center for the Study of New Orleans.

The school is also home of the Loyola Chair for Environmental Communications, an endowed professorship whose purpose is to foster comprehension of the difficult process of communicating environmental issues to the public.

FACILITIES

The School of Mass Communication is housed in an impressive building specifically designed for its purpose. The school’s equipment is outstanding for an undergraduate Mass Communication program and represents a sizable investment. Because of the nature of the field, equipment is regularly updated.

All students have access to state-of-the-art, powerful graphic computers to work on design projects, photography and public relations campaigns. Students interested in advertising and public relations can work on projects for non-profit clients in the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications.

Students work on The Wolf magazine and yearbook, and The Maroon newspaper in both print and online editions. Each year, a team of students is selected to compete in the American Advertising Federation's National Student Advertising Competition and the Public Relations Student Society's Bateman Competition.

AWARDS

Mass Communication students have achieved distinction in numerous national competitions. For example, a graduate won a 1998 Academy Award for the best short non-fiction film. One of our graduates was part of the team that won The Times-Picayune's first Pulitzer Prize, and several other graduates were part of the post-Katrina Pulitzer team. The ad team has won its district award in the American Advertising Federation Competition five out of the past ten years and has also won the National Competition. In recent years, our public relations team has won the annual National Bateman Competition, the premier student public relations competition in the country, more times than any other university in the nation.

The Maroon, our student newspaper, continues to win a large number of awards at the Southeast Journalism Conference, the Louisiana Press Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

INTERNSHIPS

Students can obtain credit for supervised internships in any of the media or public relations/advertising agencies. Many media companies contact the School of Mass Communication for interns, and these openings are posted on the school's internship board and the school's website. Some students secure an internship on their own, and they can also receive credit provided the internship meets the standards listed in the school’s Guide to Internships.

PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC SOCIETIES

The school holds memberships in the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication, the American Advertising Federation, the Public Relations Society of America, and the Society of Professional Journalists. Student organizations include Advertising Club; Kappa Tau Alpha, the national honor society in journalism and mass communication; Public Relations Student Society of America; and the Society of Professional Journalists.

FACULTY

The makeup of the faculty reflects the philosophy of the school: a group of professors and instructors who combine advanced degrees with years of professional experience.

CURRICULUM

Total number of hours required: 120
Mass Communication hours required: 36

Required courses:

CMMN A100 Introduction to Mass Communication
CMMN A101 Communications Writing

CMMN A201 Digital Communication
CMMN A400 Mass Communication Theory and Research
CMMN A401 Law of Mass Communication

Sequences:

In addition to completing the core requirements, each student must complete a coherent sequence of courses established by the school for a particular communication field. Sequences include advertising, journalism, public relations and media studies.

Graduation Requirements:

Majors in Mass Communication must have a minimum 2.0 GPA in communication courses in order to graduate.

Minors in Mass Communication must have at least a 2.0 GPA in communication courses in order to graduate.

General Requirements:

Any student wishing to take an advanced mass communication course must have at least a C in CMMN A101.

MINORS

Each Mass Communication major must also complete a minor, a set of courses in another field of study outside the school. Requirements for minors are specified elsewhere in this bulletin.

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS– MASS COMMUNICATION

Freshman
 
F
S
Major
CMMN A100 — A101
3
3
Common Curriculum
 
9
9
Foreign Language
 
3
3
 
 
15
15
 
 
 
30
Sophomore
 
F
S
Major
CMMN A201
3
3
Minor
 
3
3
Common Curriculum
 
6
6
Adjunct/Electives
 
0
3
 
 
12
15
 
 
 
27
Junior
 
F
S
Major
CMMN A400, A401, (Sequence)
6
6
Minor
 
6
6
Common Curriculum
 
6
6
 
 
18
18
 
 
 
36
Senior
 
F
S
Major
 
6
3
Minor
 
3
3
Common Curriculum
 
3
3
Adjunct/Electives
 
3
3
 
 
15
12
   
 
27
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.
 
 
 
 

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

LIMITS

No more than 42 hours in Mass Communication courses may be counted toward the 120 hours required for the degree.

Only three hours of internship may be counted toward the 120 hours required for the degree.

No Mass Communication course offered in the Common Curriculum may be used to meet major requirements for a degree or to meet Common Curriculum requirements.

View Mass Communication Course Descriptions